Baby proofing the glass in your home

Wednesday 1st August 2018

Once your child starts moving you will notice how everyday household objects suddenly become potential hazards. Baby proofing your home is therefore essential to keeping your child safe.

Some hazards are easier to identify than others. An open window poses an obvious hazard to a child learning to move but have you considered how safe the glass in the window is? Children’s thought processes are not as developed as adults – they cannot risk assess and do not know the consequences of applying pressure to glass. Additionally many older homes do not have glass that is up to current safety standards so baby proofing the glass – windows, doors and ranch sliders in your home (especially those at floor level) should be a priority.

There are three main ways to improve the safety of the glass in your home:
  1. install laminate glass;
  2. install toughened glass; and
  3. apply a film to the existing glass.

Laminate glass improves safety by holding the glass together if it breaks thereby avoiding large sharp shards of glass. Toughened glass is 5 times stronger than standard window glass and when broken it breaks into small pieces of glass to minimise injuries. Safety glass (such as laminate or toughened) should be used in areas where falls are possible, for example ranch sliders, shower enclosures or around stairs. Applying a film to existing glass is another cost-effective way to improve safety and protect from accidents. A transparent film is applied to one side of the glass and holds any glass shards together if the glass breaks. Films can also be used if you’re concerned about excessive heat and glare, faded furnishings, security or privacy.

Don’t wait for an accident to happen! Please contact Emergency Glass and discuss how we can help your household create a safer glass set up. With children being our top concern at Emergency Glass mention this blog to get 20% discount off upgrading the safety of your home for the month of August.

 
 

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